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Monday, May 4, 2020 | History

2 edition of Post-harvest deterioration of cassava found in the catalog.

Post-harvest deterioration of cassava

J. E. Wenham

Post-harvest deterioration of cassava

a biotechnology perspective

by J. E. Wenham

  • 49 Want to read
  • 34 Currently reading

Published by Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations in Rome .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Cassava -- Postharvest diseases and injuries -- Congresses.,
  • Cassava -- Postharvest losses -- Congresses.,
  • Cassava -- Postharvest technology -- Congresses.

  • Edition Notes

    StatementJ.E. Wenham.
    SeriesFAO plant production and protection paper,, 130, FAO plant production and protection papers ;, 130.
    ContributionsFood and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsSB608.C33 W35 1995
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxiv, 85 p. :
    Number of Pages85
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL586440M
    ISBN 109251036071
    LC Control Number96176544
    OCLC/WorldCa34354195

    Cassava, one of the main components of the diets of the populations of Central and West Africa, conveys an image of the culture of the poor, due to structural and technological constraints that inhibit its industrial and commercial expansion. Technological constraints are reviewed in the context of food uses of the tuber. They mainly focus on the diversity of processing practices, the low Author: Robert Ndjouenkeu. Post‐harvest physiological deterioration (PPD) is one of the most important constraints in cassava production and commercialization. It has been hypothesized that the antioxidant properties of carotenoids in yellow cassava roots may help reduce or delay PPD. The industrial sector prefers cassava with a high dry matter by: The Cassava Post-harvest Physiological Deterioration (CPPD) Project is examining carotenoid levels and post-harvest physiological deterioration (PPD) tolerance in cassava roots in Nigeria. The objective is to increase the shelf life of cassava roots post harvest. Cassava is a staple crop for over half of the Nigerian population, but its. Cassava undergoes post-harvest physiological deterioration (PPD) once the tubers are separated from the main plant. The tubers, when damaged, normally respond with a healing mechanism. However, the same mechanism, which involves coumaric acids, starts about 15 minutes after damage, and fails to switch off in harvested : Angiosperms.

    Fresh cassava roots are traditionally marketed without post-harvest treatment or protection and therefore have to reach the consumer within a very short time before deterioration becomes visible. The negative effects of the rapid deterioration of fresh roots lead to high marketing margins.


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Post-harvest deterioration of cassava by J. E. Wenham Download PDF EPUB FB2

Post-harvest physiological Post-harvest deterioration of cassava book Cassava roots are highly perishable when compared with roots of other temperate and Post-harvest deterioration of cassava book root and tuber crops. This may be associated, in evolutionary and physiological terms, with the fact that they do not have endogenous dormancy, and have no function in propagation and no primordial buds where sprouting can occur (Coursey and Booth, ; Passam Author: Clair H Hershey.

Post-harvest deterioration of cassava: a biotechnology perspective. One of the major limitations to the expansion of the role of cassava as a food resource in developing regions Post-harvest deterioration of cassava book the poor post-harvest storage life of the roots, which can only be successfully stored for h after by: Cassava tissue postharvest deterioration accounts for 29% of post-harvest losses and has been reported to cause substantial qualitative and quantitative losses resulting in production and market.

The starchy storage roots of cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) deteriorate within 24 – 72 hours of harvest rendering them unpalatable and unmarketable. With Post-harvest deterioration of cassava book urbanization and Post-harvest deterioration of cassava book entry of cassava into the cash economy this post-harvest physiological deterioration (PPD) has become a major constraint to the development of this important crop, affecting farmers, processors and consumers alike.

Abstract: Post-harvest deterioration is the most important Post-harvest deterioration of cassava book of loss in cassava production and this is mainly as a result of microbial invasion of the tubers. This research was therefore carried out to identify and control the organisms responsible Post-harvest deterioration of cassava book post-harvest deterioration of cassava tubers.

Selection of transformed cassava tissue Regeneration of transgenic plants Potential of breeding for resistance to deterioration.

Chapter 5 Socio-economic importance of rapid post-harvest deterioration of cassava: quantitative and qualitative losses. Physical post-harvest loss Qualitative post-harvest loss.

Controls Post-harvest deterioration of cassava % 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 23 78 II Days after harvest Fig. Post-harvest deterioration of cassava book of vascular streaking in cassava roots during the u-day storage period. 6, Deteriorationindexforeachsampleof rootsat eachsamplingtime; 0, percentageofunacceptable roots., percentage of perfect roots.

consisted of sterile agar disks which were placed into the wound Cited by: Thus, the role of postharvest handling of freshly harvested cassava root is essential, owing to the rapid physiological deterioration of the root soon after harvest.

This situation confers a limited shelf life and, thus, creates poor utilization of the cassava root. Usually occurs days after harvest and involves a wide spectrum of fungi and bacteria which develop in the flesh, causing a variety of wet and dry rots.

This rapid post-harvest deterioration of Cassava roots places serious constraints on their distribution and use, especially where there are delays in marketing.

Currently, producers of cassava starch are confronted with a problem called post-harvest deterioration, which reduces the quantity and quality of starch in cassava roots within 24 to 48 hours after harvesting, leading to lower payments for farmers and lower starch recovery rates for by: 4.

Avoid wounding the cassava roots because it causes rapid deterioration of the roots. If the soil is compact, loosen it first. Use a wooden tool because this can cause lesser root damage than metal tools. Pull the plant gently and don't drag the roots. What is Post-harvest Physiological Deterioration.

• Physiological / biochemical changes in the root (not due to micro-organisms) • Cassava roots become unpalatable and unmarketable within 1 – 4 days • Therefore, prompt consumption and processing necessary • PPD is a major constraint to cassava production, processing and consumptionFile Size: KB.

In Minas Gerais, Brazil, the effect of storage time and cultivar differences on the rate of physiological deterioration (PD), peroxidase and polyphenoloxidase activities, and the amount of phenolics in the roots of 3 cassava cvs.

Sonora, Guaxupe and IACduring the post-harvest storage period were verified. Roots were harvested at 18 months old and the evaluations were made at 0, 2, 4, 6 Cited by: 2.

What is post-harvest physiological deterioration (PPD). • Physiological / biochemical changes in the root (not due to micro-organisms) • Becomes unpalatable and unmarketable within 24 - 72 hours of harvest • Therefore, prompt consumption or processing necessary • PPD is a major constraint to cassava production, processing and consumption.

Post harvest deterioration of cassava. Nwachukwu and Adamu of the fungi induced rot of different dimensions when ino- culated within the cassava tissue. The extent of rot in- creased with storage time, irrespective of inoculum. Post-harvest deterioration is the most important cause of loss of cassava (Manihot esculenta) production and this is mainly due to fungal diseases.

This research was conducted to identify the major fungi responsible for post-harvest deterioration of. A major constraint to the development of cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) as a crop to both farmers and processors is its starchy storage roots’ rapid post-harvest deterioration, which can render it unpalatable and unmarketable within 24–72 by: The rapid post-harvest deterioration of cassava restricts the storage potential of the fresh root to a few days.

In addition to direct physical loss of the crop, postharvest deterioration causes a reduction in root quality, which leads to price discounts and contributes to economic losses. Post-harvest deterioration is the most important cause of loss in cassava production and this is mainly as a result of microbial invasion of the tubers.

This research was therefore carried out to identify and control the organisms responsible for post-harvest deterioration of cassava tubers. Ethanolic and water extractions of Azadirachta Indica (A.

Juss) leaves and Aframomum Cited by: to modulate post harvest physiological deterioration of cassava storage roots Judith A. Owiti, Peng Zhang and Wilhelm Gruissem (in collaboration with John Beeching) Institute of Plant Sciences, ETH Zurich Institute of Plant Physiology and Ecology, Chinese Academy of Sciences ¾Cassava deteriorates rapidly after harvest.

Post-harvest approaches include storage of harvested cassava roots, enzyme inactivation, chemical application, and avoidance strategies, which can reduce losses due to wounding of the storage roots during harvest. Cassava storage roots and roots of other Cited by: 8.

Thus, the role of postharvest handling of freshly harvested cassava root is essential, owing to the rapid physiological deterioration of the root soon after harvest.

This situation confers a limited shelf life and, thus, creates poor utilization of the cassava by: Cassava is a major tropical tuber crop found throughout the tropics (India, Oceania, Africa and Latin America).

Hitherto, there has been no single text covering all aspects of cassava biology, production and utilization. This book fills that gap, representing the first comprehensive research level overview of this main staple crop.

Chapters are written by leading experts in this field from all /5(2). A major constraint in the post-harvest marketing and utilization of cassava is the high perishability of the roots.

Normally cassava roots cannot be stored without spoilage for more than days. Physiological, biochemical as well as pathological factors operate to bring about the decay of the harvested Size: KB.

POST -HARVEST OETERIORATION ANO PERTINENT STORAGE CONSIOERATIONS 1herc is little reliable information available on tbe rapid pust-harvest dete­ rioration of cassava routs; it has been thought to be caused by pathogens andior physiological reactions.

Primary and secondary deteriorationFile Size: KB. Post-harvest physiological deterioration of cassava. In M. Nakatani, & K. Komaki (Eds.), 12th Symposium of the International Society for Tropical Root Crops: Potential of root crops for food and industrial resources (pp. Tsukuba: by: Tolerant varieties can effectively control post-harvest physiological deterioration (PPD) of cassava, although knowledge on the genetic variability and inheritance of this trait is needed.

The objective of this study was to estimate genetic parameters and identify sources of tolerance to PPD and their stability in cassava : M.T. Venturini, L.R. Santos, C.I.A. Vildoso, V.S. Santos, E.J. Oliveira. Physiological postharvest deterioration (PPD) of cassava roots is an endogenous and complex process that restricts their storage potential to only a few days after harvest.

Postharvest Physiological Deterioration Scoring. Five independent evaluations of PPD were carried out. For each harvest, a random sample of three sliced roots from each plant variety was scored according to visual observations of sliced cassava roots (from 1 –10% of deterioration to 10–% of deterioration) at each stage of PPD (i.e., 3, 5, 8, and 11 days postharvest) and imaged Cited by: 8.

Get this from a library. Post-harvest deterioration of cassava: a biotechnology perspective. [J E Wenham; Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations.]. Cassava (Mannihot esculenta Cranz) is a tropical woody shrub. It is the 6th most consumed crops in the world.

In sub-Saharan Africa cassava is the second most important staple food being the major source of food energy providing up to calories per person per day for over million people in the continent and for million people world wide and being cultivated in more than 90 Cited by: 2.

Abstract. A study of the mechanism of the rapid deterioration of cassava roots has shown that this requires the presence of oxygen and scopoletin, the latter a Scopoletin Involvement in Post-Harvest Physiological Deterioration of Cassava Root (Manihot esculenta Crantz), Journal of Experimental Botany, Vol Issue 5, MayPages Cited by: cassava as a commercial food crop in developing countries.

We investigated the molecular changes during physiological deterioration of cassava root after harvesting using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) of proteins in soluble and non-soluble fractions prepared during a 96 h post-harvest time by: Mapping Wound-Response Genes Involved In Post-Harvest Physiological Deterioration (PPD) of Cassava (Manihot Esculenta Crantz).

viruses and cassava brown streak viruses), pests and post-harvest physiological deterioration (PPD). PPD is an endogenous process that renders the roots unmarketable and unpalatable within approximately hours after harvest.

Although harvesting triggers a wound response, cassava is unable to modulate the accumulation of reactive. Fungitoxic potentials of Piper guineense, Ocimum graticimum, Casia alata, and Tagetes erecta extracts in the management of postharvest fungal deterioration of cassava root were investigated.

Pathogenicity tests revealed Aspergillus niger, and Trichodderma viride as causal organisms of root rot of cassava which utilized the substrate for their growth and : A. Amadioha, Kenkwo Promise Chidi. Postharvest physiological deterioration (PPD) is a serious abiotic stress in cassava that renders the roots unmarketable, thereby reducing the economic value of the crop.

This study was undertaken to determine farmers‟ perception of PPD and identify cassava genotypes with delayed PPD that can be used for better shelf life improvement of cassava. Post-harvest physiological deterioration (PPD) Cassava Oxidative stress PPD symptoms Metabolites ABSTRACT The production of cassava, the most important staple root crop in the world, is constrained by the short shelf life of the cassava storage roots that are undergoing post-harvest physiological deterioration (PPD) shortly after harvest.

Post-harvest physiological deterioration of cassava roots is a serious limiting factor affecting storage over even short periods of time. The resulting black pigments render the roots inedible to both humans and animals. A better understanding of the causes of this problem and methods of control were the principal aims of the current by: Cassava, therefore, has great potential for combating poverty as well as food and nutritional insecurity.

Potentially limiting, cassava roots have a very short shelf life. This is because post-harvest physiological deterioration (PPD) is rapid, beginning within 24 to 48 hours after harvest, and can result in losses in the range of 40–60% of.

Accumulation of Hydroxycoumarins During Post-harvest Pdf of Tuberous Roots of Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) Holger Buschmann Department of Biology & Biochemistry, University of Bath, Bath, BA2 7AY, UK Centro International de Agricultura Tropical, CIAT, Cited by: Add tags for "Cassava storage: post-harvest deterioration and storage of fresh cassava roots".

Be the first.Postharvest ebook deterioration or vascular streaking of cassava clones (accessions and breeding lines) was evaluated with harvests at different ages (8 and 12 mo.), seasons (beginning and end of wet season), and locations (CIAT-Palmira, Carimagua, and Caribia in Colombia) to assess the effect of environmental factors on cassava by: 1.